Goal Setting

Regular goal setting is important for everyone, and if we start early with the kids and make it fun, it can become a habit for life. Many schools now run through a goal setting exercise at the beginning of every school year and school term, with regular reviews along the way. You can do the same, or of course you can set some goals with the kids yourself at home.

Whether you choose to use our Goal Setting resources at New Year, Back to School time or perhaps even the beginning of every month, we hope you will find some fun and inspiring printables below!

Activity Village's goal setting printables for kids

A Way I Can Be a Good Friend writing frame

A Way I Can Be a Good Friend

Use this printable to help children think about the ways in which they can build friendships - either in general or with a specific friend.

Books I Would Like To Read

Books I Would Like To Read

Here's a fun way to keep a reading list! Just get the kids to write the names of the books (and maybe the authors) on the spines and covers on the picture.

If I Could Learn About Anything

If I Could Learn About Anything

If I could learn about anything at all, I would like to learn about.... Children can draw pictures or write about all the things they would most like to learn about using this open book printable.

If I Could Travel Anywhere

If I Could Travel Anywhere

Encourage children to use their imagination and/or their goal setting skills to think about the place that they would like to travel, if they could travel anywhere in the world (or beyond it!) Youn

Most Important Goal For The Year

Most Important Goal For The Year

If the kids can only choose one, really important, mega goal for the year, what will it be? Use this printable page (which comes blank for drawings and lined for writing) to detail it out.

My Idea

My Idea

Here's a fun way to capture your child's best ideas - in a light bulb frame! We've got a blank version for drawings and doodles and a lined version for passionate words...

My Wish for the World

My Wish for the World

You can use this printable at the beginning of each year, or at any time, to encourage children to think about what changes they would like to see in the world.

My Wish Frame

My Wish Frame

The border to this pretty printable page repeats "My Wish" - and that's what we want children to capture on it, whether by picture or writing.

Protecting The Environment Printables

Protecting The Environment Printables

We have three variations of printable on the "protecting the environment" theme. The first asks children to draw a picture of themselves protecting the environment.

The Best Dream Printable

The Best Dream

Children can draw or write about the best dream they can imagine having on this lovely printable page, which comes in two versions - one "framed" and one borderless.

This is a Way I Can Help At Home

This is a Way I Can Help At Home

Thinking about how a child can help at home is the theme of this printable page. Perhaps he or she could help with chores, tidying up a bedroom and putting away toys, reading to a baby br

Three Stars for 2016

Three Stars for 2016

This is one of our most popular New Year printables. Children write down one "wish" for 2016 into each of the stars. Younger children could draw their wishes.

What Would I Take With Me

What Would I Take With Me

What would I take with me ... if I were going to the Bahamas on holiday, or trekking in the jungle, or travelling to the moon (and back)! You can use this lovely printable frame in so many ways.

Why should children set goals?

Feeling in control is an important part of feeling happy and confident. Regular and careful goal setting can help children feel that they are taking control of their own behaviour and working towards something; having a positive impact, no matter how small.

A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
Lao-Tzu

Be careful to keep the goals realistic and measured. Start small!

Some supervision might be necessary here, as the last thing you want is for children to set goals that are just too high and impossible to reach. It doesn't necessarily help a child to boldly declare "I will play football for Chelsea". Instead try "I will work 15 minutes every day to improve my football skills by practising ball control".

Think about the time scale for your children's goals.

Many people like to set an end-date to make their goals "measurable", and if you are working on goals in a school-setting this may well be appropriate. I have found, however, that a time-scale can put children - especially younger children - off. Young children find it hard to understand the concept of time. It can be more effective to set a simple goal which can be "ticked off" every night before bed, which has the added benefit of teaching children how to instill a good habit. "I made my room tidy before I left for school" or "I got everything ready for tomorrow before bedtime" can be useful skills - and goals, too!

It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop.
Confucius

Think about what might get in the way before you start.

If your child has decided that they want to read a book a week, but you know they spend most of their reading time watching television instead, the time to point it out is when the goal is being set. They might even include it in the goal itself. "I will turn off the TV 20 minutes before supper so that I can spend that time reading instead."

Show children how to break down their goals into smaller steps.

A child that wants to be prime minister one day might start by trying out for class representative, or signing up for public speaking practice after school.

Look out for goal-setting opportunities.

When a child starts a sentence with "I wish I could..." or "I wish I had..." - there's a possible goal to work towards at the end of it, even it just means some careful saving up of pocket money for the lastest video game!

Try to encourage co-operative goals rather than competitive goals.

Some children might want to "come first" in all their tests. Perhaps a better goal would be "to score over 80% in all my tests". That way, the outcome is something that they contribute to and, at least to some extent, achieve by their own hard work.

Make sure kids choose their own goals - not just try to please others!

If you are working with your children to set goals, it can be tempting to "help" with your own ideas - especially if you have a reluctant child! Try hard to elicit a goal from the child rather than impose your own.

Remind children that they don't have to achieve all their goals!

Goals are something to work towards and aim for. Falling short isn't necessarily a bad thing, if we keep moving in the right direction. Remind kids to learn from their slip-ups and road-blocks. Keeping a record of goals set and tracking how children work towards them can help with this.

Aim for the moon. If you miss, you may hit a star.
W. Clement Stone